Formula 1

Singapore Grand Prix Becomes the Next Cancelled Event of 2021 After the Canadian GP!

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Singapore Grand Prix not happening?

With Canada canceled just a fortnight ago and now with the news of the cancellation of the Singapore Grand Prix, it appears that the 2021 F1 season is as much about on-track tussles as off–track unpredictability.

The street courses bring about a lot of fun and unbridled enthusiasm among fans and perhaps even for drivers who engage in a titanic tussle in a minefield replete with one key challenge, the demanding task of overtaking, rather than the lack of it.

There’ve Been Lots of Fun Moments at the Singapore Grand Prix

Remember Massa on Bruno Senna in the 2012 season for the Brazilian with Ferrari? At the same time, the Singapore Grand Prix has also enforced grief-stricken high-speed opening lap accidents, with the Raikkonen-Verstappen-Vettel sandwich in the 2017 event becoming a huge discussion point as also a meme material.

It is the one track, over the years, that has gone on to demonstrate a driver’s penchant for executing brilliant passes in a venue that’s a bit adverse to the idea that is the Singapore-bound street circuit.

The third street course, in a usually packed season unaffected by cancellations and last-minute withdrawals, Singapore Grand Prix’s pacy corners and relatively short start/finish line impose upon the world’s twenty fastest men a challenge of a stern nature.

A Challenging Race Course!

Albeit this time around, much like in 2020, there’s going to be no Singapore Grand Prix. And the reason, it ought to be said, is the fear surrounding the COVID 19 pandemic, the giant killer of sorts, not just of human life but any kind of sporting enthusiasm that fans have of their favorite sports.

The cancellation of the event was confirmed and elaborated upon by the mega night race’s organizers in a media statement that read as follows:

“We understand that our fans were looking forward to another edition of the Formula 1 Singapore Grand Prix,” said the deputy chairman of Singapore GP Pte Ltd Colin Syn.

“To cancel the event for a second year is an incredibly difficult decision, but a necessary one in light of the prevailing restrictions for live events in Singapore.”

“We would not be able to deliver a full event experience [that] fans have come to expect over the years while safeguarding the health and safety of our fans, contractors, volunteers, and staff,” he added. “Ultimately, we have to be responsible, cautious, and prudent as safety is our number one concern.”

What Happened in the Last Singapore Grand Prix?

That being said, it’s worthwhile to note that with the cancellation of the Singapore Grand Prix, the only thoughts that ring in mind are that of Sebastian Vettel’s sensational victory back in 2019, the first year of the experienced German’s pairing with the young Monegasque Charles Leclerc.

And while both Ferrari’s seemed to be contending with nearly identical pace, Vettel’s tactical handling of the race accompanied by a strategy that pitted Leclerc in order to give the German unanticipated advantage worked perfectly for the former Ferrari driver.

It was also an event that was remembered for the warm gesture in the race’s aftermath, with Lewis Hamilton rushing onto congratulate his title adversary Vettel, the German having clearly struggled for form and pace up to that point. Alas, we shall not see any such moments this time around. And the Singapore Grand Prix, which was also interestingly the only occasion where Antonio Giovinazzi led an F1 race in his career, will be devoid of the many changes that would’ve allowed the likes of Verstappen, Norris, and Leclerc – three of the sport’s most promising young guns to engage in a night duel.


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Featured Image Credits to Embed from Getty Images

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