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Miami Heat Season Recap: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

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After the nightmare of a first round, the Miami Heat season is (finally) over. The Miami Heat capsized at the hands of the Milwaukee Bucks to put an end to this long, harsh season. In this Miami Heat season recap, we’ll go over the good, the bad, and the ugly of the 2020-21 NBA season.

Miami Heat Season Recap: The Good

Coming off a Cinderella season in 2020 with their first finals berth since the LeBron James era, the Miami Heat were expected to turn heads in 2021 with their ever-improving unit. That, however, wasn’t even close to what happened.

In a sub-par regular season, there were some upsides:

One of those being Jimmy Butler performing well enough to be considered a top 10 MVP candidate. Butler had an incredible regular season, posting career highs in rebounds (6.9 RPG), assists (7.1 APG), and field goal percentage (49.7%). Butler carried the team through tough competition throughout a lot of the regular season.


Dewayne Dedmon was a diamond in the rough for Miami. Dedmon came in as a spark for a lackadaisical Heat team, averaging career bests per 36 minutes in points, rebounds, assists, steals, and field goal percentage. The Heat should look to include Dedmon in the future as they look to reload.

Miami Heat Season Recap: The Bad

Where can we even begin. The season was not what Heat fans expected in the slightest bit, finishing with a mediocre record of 40-34 and a first-round sweep. What went wrong?

To start, the loss of Jae Crowder can be viewed as a key missing link to this year’s team. A 3-and-D threat night in and night out, Crowder leaves his heart on the court every single game. The Heat obviously missed this sparkplug throughout the season.


The “Boy Wonder,” Tyler Herro, was expected to take a huge leap this season after his incredible rookie playoff performances. This, however, did not happen like fans wanted. Herro did post better averages in multiple stat categories, but the fire just wasn’t there. He was inconsistent and seemed distracted at times.


Bam Adebayo might be the biggest disappointment this season. Like Herro, Bam was expected to make a giant leap to borderline superstar status. Bam’s defense is undeniable. Arguably a top 5 defender in the league, Adebayo is versatile enough to lock up almost anybody on the court.

Defense wasn’t the problem with the fourth-year center. The problem came at the offensive end. It seemed that Bam was scared to take over games. He oftentimes wasn’t looking to score, and if he started the game with a couple misses, you could see his confidence leave him.


The Heat finished the regular season ranked 25th in PPG and 29th in RPG; not a very good combo for any NBA team. Hopefully Pat Riley can make some off-season moves to bring this team back from the trenches.

Miami Heat Season Recap: The Ugly

From injuries to health and safety protocols, this season was not an easy one for anybody. A 71-day offseason is not nearly enough to recover, and that’s the biggest challenge the Heat and Lakers had to face. Fatigue played a big factor in the season for both teams, and when it comes down to it, this could be the reason for the rough season.


Look for a roster rebuild in the offseason, as Duncan Robinson and Kendrick Nunn are both free agents and looking at big contracts. Both currently on similar, small contracts, losing them won’t give us much added cap space to pursue a high-caliber superstar.

Concluding Season Thoughts

This article just scratches the surface of the season that the Miami Heat endured. This longer offseason might be exactly what the Heat need to come back ready to win again next year. Sometimes a little added rest can go a long way in a season such as this one.

What are your hopes for the next season? Who should the Heat target in free agency? Who should we let walk? Let me know in the comments or tag @OTHMiami in a tweet!


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